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CEO pay for major companies in the United States rose nearly 6% in the past year, as income inequality and the outsourcing of good-paying American jobs have increased. According to the new AFL-CIO Executive Paywatch, the average CEO of an S&P 500 Index company made $13.94 million in 2017—361 times more money than the average U.S. rank-and-file worker.

Tefere Gebre came to the United States in 1984 as a teenager. He and four friends had left their home in war-torn Ethiopia and walked nearly 500 miles across the desert to a refugee camp in Sudan.

When it comes to appreciating educators, please heed an old expression: Walk the walk, don’t just talk the talk.

Never before has there been so much labor unrest in America’s public schools. Teachers, understandably angry about low pay and harmful cuts in education resources, have organized statewide walkouts in West Virginia, Kentucky and Oklahoma.

When we fail to invest in public services, living standards decline and communities suffer — overcrowded classrooms, understaffed prisons and more.

But let’s remember what originally made public-sector jobs middle class: labor unions. The right to bargain collectively has allowed millions of public service workers like my father, a Cleveland bus driver and a member of the Amalgamated Transit Union, to live the American dream.

In any business, the people who do the work deserve to have a voice in their working conditions.

APRIL, 26, MILWAUKEE, WI – Wisconsin working people are proud to support Ironworker Randy Bryce for Wisconsin’s 1st congressional district. As a union ironworker for 20 years, Randy Bryce knows that everyone who works hard deserves a fair shot at the American Dream.

Brookfield, WI — Tom Palzewicz, candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives in Wisconsin’s 5th district, today announced the endorsement of the Wisconsin State AFL-CIO.

When we kiss our loved ones’ goodbye to head to work, we don’t expect tragedy. Saturday is Workers Memorial Day, a time for all of us to remember those who went to work but unfortunately never returned home because they lost their lives while on the job. It’s also a day to remember that we must keep fighting for safe workplaces and continue to fight short cuts that lawmakers are pursuing as they turn back the clock on health and safety regulations in Congress.

Harvard research and teaching assistants' vote to unionize last week was unique in its scale and drew on a decades-long push to form graduate student unions, according to several labor experts and union organizers.

On April 28, Wisconsin workers will join together with communities across the globe to pay tribute to workers killed on the job. In cities, towns, union halls, at worksites and memorials, in community after community, workers will commemorate those we lost and press forward for stronger protections for safer workplaces.