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Working people are tired of hearing how tax giveaways for Wall Street billionaires and corporations will supposedly trickle down to the rest of us.

“What we know from RNRN’s work in previous disaster-stricken areas, including hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as post-earthquake Haiti and super typhoon Haiyan, is that after an initial surge

Working people are taking fewer vacation days and working more.

The head of the country's largest organization of labor unions Saturday described recent talks with President Trump about manufacturing in the United States as “not very satisfying.” “He only talked about eliminating regulations,” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka told the Tribune-Review during a stop in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

Read the full article in The Tribune-Review.

Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) and UNITE HERE's Maria Elena Durazo write that President Trump, both in words and actions, continues to threaten immigrant workers and families. But says that even in the face of these challenges, there is hope. Our ambitions remain broad, our commitment is undaunted and we are fighting to build a foundation for a fairer, stronger America.

Read the full article in The Hill.

Trumka’s posture toward Trump is not one of total opposition. He’s skeptical and suspicious, certainly. In addition to thinking Trump has gone Wall Street as president, Trumka fears that Trump will gut labor safety regulations and thinks he probably can’t bring jobs back to the coal fields in huge numbers.

Read the full article in The Daily Beast.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka issued the statement Thursday while negotiators were meeting behind closed doors for a third straight day.

Donald J. Trump made coal miners a central metaphor of his presidential campaign, promising to “put our miners back to work” and look after their interests in a way that the Obama administration did not. Now, three months into his presidency, comes a test of that promise.

Unless Congress intervenes by late April, government-funded health benefits will abruptly lapse for more than 20,000 retired miners, concentrated in Trump states that include Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. Many of the miners have serious health problems arising from their years in the mines.

Working families have been attending Joint Finance Committee budget hearings with our budget summary in their back pocket to sound the alarm on many of the harmful proposals outlined in the budget.

Our voices are working!

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka gave a major address at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on April 4, 2017. He assessed opportunities around trade and infrastructure that could create jobs, as well as possible threats to workers' rights. President Trumka spoke about the labor movement's strategy to create a unifying agenda for working families, and the importance it places on ensuring that all workers have the right to bargain collectively for better wages and working conditions.

The Wisconsin State AFL-CIO has been analyzing and breaking down Gov. Walker’s proposed 2017-2019 biennial budget. The budget is 989 pages long and make no mistake, there’s many provisions that will hurt working families and rollback workplace rights in Wisconsin.

We’ve put together a budget summary document that outlines some of the most egregious parts of Walker’s budget.

View the full document here.