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Working people are tired of hearing how tax giveaways for Wall Street billionaires and corporations will supposedly trickle down to the rest of us.

“What we know from RNRN’s work in previous disaster-stricken areas, including hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as post-earthquake Haiti and super typhoon Haiyan, is that after an initial surge

Working people are taking fewer vacation days and working more.

Sheet metal worker and 9/11 first responder Joe Rabito takes 14 medications a day so he can breathe. Joe was one of the tens of thousands of first responders in New York City who went out to help survivors of the World Trade Center attacks.

These people, many of them union members, are still feeling the physical and mental long-term health effects from the work they did as first responders. 

This is why the Zadroga Act, which provides permanent health care and compensation to 9/11 survivors and first responders, is so important. 

Based on exit poll data for the 2012 election, over 70% of African American women voted in the election, 65.6% of white women, 62.6% percent of white men and 61.4% of African American men voted in the same election. “The reason why Black women made the difference is because we bring our entire household to the polls with us” said Carmen Berkley, director of Civil, Human and Woman’s Rights, AFL-CIO. “An investment in Black women is an investment in a number of different people within a particular household.”
AFL-CIO president, Richard Trumka, published a new column on Huffington Post. He writes how Hillary roots for working people and why working people are championing her in tonight's presidential debate.

“Women are more activist than men,” said AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, “and understand that Clinton supports collective bargaining, raising the minimum wage and paid time off for illness and family care.” This year the AFL-CIO is targeting women as an individual voting group for the first time in a presidential race. Earlier this month 15,000 women, three times as many as expected, joined a conference call Shuler led to discuss strategies for convincing coworkers and relatives to vote for Clinton. 

Important elections are coming this fall. In addition to electing the next president of the United States, we will be voting for members of Congress, and state and local leaders. The outcome of these elections is likely to have a direct impact on your life, from the president, who will make lifetime appointments, to the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal courts to the city council members, who will decide whether or not you get that stoplight at the dangerous intersection near your home.

One night at his UPS job, Tefere Gebre's co-worker handed him some union material. 

“He told me that I’d get health care and vacation and other benefits by filling it out. I said, ‘Are you serious?’ I thought, ‘Hmm. Everyone should have that.’”

Tefere, the executive vice president of the AFL-CIO, has been a proud union member for most of his life, valuing the freedom of people to come together in union.

Growing up in rural Kentucky, Augusta Thomas witnessed the extreme measures elected officials would take to prevent African-American men from voting.
Culinary worker Brittany Bronson talks not only about the benefits of joining her union, but also about the opportunities being part of a unionized workforce offer women, particularly women who have long careers in the workforce.