News

Sisters and Brothers  of the Rock County Labor Council, as you probably heard, we recently held elections of officers at our December Meeting.  Although they chose not to run this term,  I wanted to thank both Ivan Collins and Kevin Bishop for their hard work and tireless hours spent on behalf of labor.  They both plan to continue their hard work while focusing in on Laborfest and a variety of other Labor functions.The new officers are the following.

  • President – Shawn Reents
  • Recording Secretary – Mike Williams
  • Treasurer – Teri Laws
  • Vice President – Jim Millard
  • Sergeant at Arms – David  Groth
  • Trustees – Amy Nunn, Randi Shultz, Leo Sokolik & Troy Johnson

 Our next meeting is scheduled for March 27th, at 6:30 p.m. at the Janesville Labor Temple. 

Thanks and I hope to see everyone there!

Tefere Gebre came to the United States in 1984 as a teenager. He and four friends had left their home in war-torn Ethiopia and walked nearly 500 miles across the desert to a refugee camp in Sudan.

When it comes to appreciating educators, please heed an old expression: Walk the walk, don’t just talk the talk.

APRIL, 26, MILWAUKEE, WI – Wisconsin working people are proud to support Ironworker Randy Bryce for Wisconsin’s 1st congressional district.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership died because it ultimately failed America’s working families. Instead of addressing the economic devastation wreaked by wrong-headed trade deals, the TPP doubled down on a failed, corporate-driven ideology.

As walkouts by teachers protesting low pay and education funding shortfalls spread across the country, the small but growing movement to recruit teachers from overseas is another sign of the difficulty some districts are having providing the basics to public school students.

Never before has there been so much labor unrest in America’s public schools. Teachers, understandably angry about low pay and harmful cuts in education resources, have organized statewide walkouts in West Virginia, Kentucky and Oklahoma.

When we fail to invest in public services, living standards decline and communities suffer — overcrowded classrooms, understaffed prisons and more.

But let’s remember what originally made public-sector jobs middle class: labor unions. The right to bargain collectively has allowed millions of public service workers like my father, a Cleveland bus driver and a member of the Amalgamated Transit Union, to live the American dream.

In any business, the people who do the work deserve to have a voice in their working conditions.

When we kiss our loved ones’ goodbye to head to work, we don’t expect tragedy. Saturday is Workers Memorial Day, a time for all of us to remember those who went to work but unfortunately never returned home because they lost their lives while on the job. It’s also a day to remember that we must keep fighting for safe workplaces and continue to fight short cuts that lawmakers are pursuing as they turn back the clock on health and safety regulations in Congress.

Harvard research and teaching assistants' vote to unionize last week was unique in its scale and drew on a decades-long push to form graduate student unions, according to several labor experts and union organizers.

Organized labor managed an increasingly rare feat on Monday — a political victory — when its allies turned back a Senate measure aimed at rolling back labor rights on tribal lands.

The legislation, called the Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act, would have exempted enterprises owned and operated by Native American tribes from federal labor standards, even for employees who were not tribal citizens.