News

Support for the labor movement is the highest in nearly half a century, yet only one in 10 workers are members of unions today. How can both be true?

Ivanka Trump took the stage at CES on Tuesday to muted reception. Forty minutes later, she left to robust applause.

After a quarter century of suffering under the failed North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and 18 months of hard-fought negotiations, the American Federation of Labor and

Stop & Shop’s stores were ghost towns during the recent strike.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka cautioned the public not to become “numb” to workplace fatalities and illnesses, as his organization released its annual report detailing the hazards workers face every day.

The debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) spans more than 25 years. The trade deal was originally negotiated by the first Bush administration, then came up for a vote early in President Clinton’s first term with opposition from a broad coalition of Democrats, unions, some environmental groups, family farmers and others.

Patt Moon-Updike wanted to be a nurse since she was 9 years old. In 2007, after raising her family, she was finally able to make that dream come true after graduating from nursing school and joining the Wisconsin Federation of Nurses and Health Professionals, a union affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers.

Every April 28, in cities, towns, union halls, at worksites and memorials, and in community after community—union members gather to remember our brothers and sisters who have lost their lives at work.

Voters in Assembly District 64 have an upcoming special election on Tuesday, April 30. This will be a very close race. In the last election for Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice earlier this month, the 64th Assembly District only went for Judge Lisa Neubauer by a few hundred votes.

As the tax deadline looms and millions scurry to get their forms sent on time, Tax Day is a good time to dispel the myth that the U.S. Postal Service is funded by tax dollars.

At an industry conference for video game developers in late March, the thousands of lanyarded attendees could try new games, swap business cards and hear from experts on rendering realistic blood spatter.

Or they could talk about unionizing.

Hundreds joined a series of standing-room-only roundtables on the topic of organized labor, taking time away from the Game Developers Conference to brainstorm ways to build worker power in an industry that is almost entirely nonunion.