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Despite its setbacks, or perhaps because of them, organized labor has an energy level that AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka says he hasn’t seen before in his 50 years with the movement.

On May 7, while recovering from an illness, Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) International President Larry Hanley died suddenly.  In a brief statement, his family,

Patt Moon-Updike wanted to be a nurse since she was 9 years old.

In any business, the people who do the work deserve to have a voice in their working conditions.

APRIL, 26, MILWAUKEE, WI – Wisconsin working people are proud to support Ironworker Randy Bryce for Wisconsin’s 1st congressional district. As a union ironworker for 20 years, Randy Bryce knows that everyone who works hard deserves a fair shot at the American Dream.

Brookfield, WI — Tom Palzewicz, candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives in Wisconsin’s 5th district, today announced the endorsement of the Wisconsin State AFL-CIO.

When we kiss our loved ones’ goodbye to head to work, we don’t expect tragedy. Saturday is Workers Memorial Day, a time for all of us to remember those who went to work but unfortunately never returned home because they lost their lives while on the job. It’s also a day to remember that we must keep fighting for safe workplaces and continue to fight short cuts that lawmakers are pursuing as they turn back the clock on health and safety regulations in Congress.

Harvard research and teaching assistants' vote to unionize last week was unique in its scale and drew on a decades-long push to form graduate student unions, according to several labor experts and union organizers.

On April 28, Wisconsin workers will join together with communities across the globe to pay tribute to workers killed on the job. In cities, towns, union halls, at worksites and memorials, in community after community, workers will commemorate those we lost and press forward for stronger protections for safer workplaces.

Organized labor managed an increasingly rare feat on Monday — a political victory — when its allies turned back a Senate measure aimed at rolling back labor rights on tribal lands.

The legislation, called the Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act, would have exempted enterprises owned and operated by Native American tribes from federal labor standards, even for employees who were not tribal citizens.

The notion of bringing home 80 cents for every dollar pocketed by a man on a national basis is unsettling enough. But it's even more startling when those lost wages are added up.

Overall, it amounts to $10,000 in lost wages a year, says Debra Ness, president of the National Partnership for Women and Families. That chunk of cash could pay for 14 more months of child care, 74 more weeks of groceries and an additional 10 months of rent for the average woman.