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Wisconsin AFL-CIO Stands in Solidarity with SMART Local 565 workers at Trachte Building Systems in Sun Prairie

Wisconsin AFL-CIO Stands in Solidarity with UAW Workers on Strike at CNHi

On April 28 unions of the AFL-CIO observe Workers Memorial Day to Honor All Workers Killed and Injured on the Job and to Pledge to Continue the Fight for Saf

The U.S. tech sector is the next frontier for labor organizing, and its workers are starting to understand the collective power unions have, President of the AFL-CIO Liz Shuler said on Friday at the Reuters Next Conference.

When Liz Shuler rides on an airplane, she often has an experience that will be familiar to most travelers: Her seat mate asks, "What do you do?"

Five years ago, after saying she worked for a labor union, Shuler said, most people would put their noses back in their books. Today, she's met with reactions like "awesome" and "amazing." 

Statement from Wisconsin AFL-CIO President Stephanie Bloomingdale on the U.S. House of Representatives’ passage of the Build Back Better Act:

“The Build Back Better Act will level the playing field for working families for generations to come. It is the largest-ever investment in clean energy, with domestic content and high labor standards across the board. This legislation will empower workers organizing together in union by holding union-busting employers accountable with real financial penalties.

Wisconsin AFL-CIO President Stephanie Bloomingdale released the following statement following Governor Evers’ veto of Republican-drawn election maps:

"Rigging our political system with unjust, immoral and antidemocratic maps cannot continue to stand in Wisconsin. We thank Governor Tony Evers for using his veto pen to stand up for democracy, fight for fair maps, and protect the voices of voters in our electoral system.

NYT: How did you get your start in the labor movement?

Liz Shuler: I came up through the IBEW [International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers]. My father was a union member and worked for PGE [an Oregon utility]. Clerical workers were not in a union, and my mother and I were organizing them. PGE was a study in the difference a union can make: Power linemen were respected and made good wages, and nonunion clerical workers were not listened to and didn’t have a voice.

The picket line has been crowded lately. Tens of thousands of workers are on strike, including nurses in Massachusetts, United Auto Workers at John Deere, coal miners in Alabama, metal workers in West Virginia, hospital workers in New York, ironworkers in Pennsylvania and Kellogg’s workers in four states.

Workers at companies like Kellogg’s, Nabisco and John Deere have hit the picket lines in recent weeks hoping to get a better deal from their employers. A new survey suggests the public by and large supports them.

The AFL-CIO labor federation commissioned the progressive pollster Data for Progress to take the public’s temperature on the strikes that have made headlines this summer and fall. The online survey of nearly 1,300 likely voters asked if they “approve or disapprove of employees going on strike in support of better wages, benefits, and working conditions.”

Marcial Reyes could have just quit his job. Frustrated with chronic understaffing at the Kaiser Permanente hospital where he works in Southern California, he knows he has options in a region desperate for nurses.

Instead, he voted to go on strike.